Soundproofing Ceilings 2018-02-14T12:37:09+00:00

SOUNDPROOFING CEILINGS

Ceilings

This page deals with the different solutions for soundproofing ceilings.

Consideration needs to be given for the aesthetics and practical installation of an acoustic ceiling.

  • Can the room bare a reduction of ceiling height in its proportions?
  • Is there sufficient height above doors and windows to install an acoustic ceiling?
  • Do you want to replicate original plaster cornice and decorative mouldings?
  • Think about lighting. Cutting holes in acoustic linings (recessed lights) causes reduced performance?

Timber Framed Separating Ceilings

Use this system where there is a limited floor to ceiling height.

This system will typically create a 35 mm loss of height.

Ceiling insulation

  • By removing the existing plasterboard or lathe and plaster ceiling access is gained to the cavities between the structural joists.
  • Acoustic insulation 100 mm slab (RWA 45Kg) is cut and friction fitted between the joists as a blanket coverage.
  • A system of resilient bars is attached perpendicular to the existing joists at 450 mm centres.
  • A primary layer of 19 mm plasterboard plank is hung from the resilient bar.
  • Gaps between butted joints and around the perimeter of the plane are sealed to airtight.
  • A secondary layer of 12.5 mm soundbloc plasterboard is hung from the resilient bar.
  • Lighting cables and switch lines are extended through the new structure and connected in surface mounted ceiling roses. The new surface is set with a plaster skim coat.

Resilient Bar System with existing ceiling in place

Use this system where there are limited height restrictions or a solid ceiling exists.

This system will typically create a 50 mm loss of height.

  • The existing ceiling board remains in place.
  • Resilient bars are attached through the existing plasterboard ceiling in to the structural joist timbers.
  • Acoustic insulation 25 mm quilt (RWA 45 kg) is fitted between the bars as a blanket coverage to the ceiling plane.
  • A primary layer of 19 mm plasterboard plank is hung from the resilient bar.
  • Gaps between butted joints and around the perimeter of the plane are sealed to airtight.
  • A secondary layer of 12.5 mm soundbloc plasterboard is hung from the resilient bar.
  • Lighting cables and switch lines are extended through the new structure and connected in surface mounted ceiling roses.
  • The new surface is set with a plaster skim coat.

Attached ‘C’ Clip System with existing ceiling in place

Use this system where there are limited height restrictions or a solid ceiling exists.

This system will typically create a 100 mm loss of height.

  • A system of ‘C’ clips are attached through the existing plasterboard ceiling in to the structural joist timbers.
  • A framework of 45 mm x 45 mm timber battens are attached to the ‘C’ clips.
  • Acoustic insulation 50 mm (RWA 45 kg is cut and friction fitted between the battens as a blanket coverage to the frame.
  • Resilient bars can be attached to the timber battens for additional mechanical isolation of the new boards from the frame.
  • A primary layer of 19 mm plasterboard plank is hung from the resilient bar or fixed directly to the timber batten.
  • Gaps between butted joints and around the perimeter of the plane are sealed to airtight.
  • A secondary layer of 12.5 mm soundbloc plasterboard is hung from the resilient bar.
  • Lighting cables and switch lines are extended through the new structure and connected in surface mounted ceiling roses.
  • The new surface is set with a plaster skim coat.

Independent Acoustic Ceiling System

Use this system where there are no height restrictions or a solid ceiling exists.

This system will typically create a 170 mm loss of height.

  • A timber plate 100 x 50 mm is bolted to the perimeter walls 15 mm below the ceiling line lowest point.
  • New 100 x 50 mm timber joists are fitted spanning the room with stabilising cross noggins at intervals.
  • Acoustic insulation 100 mm slab (RWA 45 Kg) is cut and friction fitted between the joists as a blanket coverage to the frame.
  • A system of resilient bars is attached perpendicular to the new joists at 450 mm centres.
  • A primary layer of 19 mm plasterboard plank is hung from the resilient bar.
  • Gaps between butted joints and around the perimeter of the plane are sealed to airtight.
  • A secondary layer of 12.5 mm soundbloc plasterboard is hung from the resilient bar.
  • Lighting cables and switch lines are extended through the new structure and connected in surface mounted ceiling roses.
  • The new surface is set with a plaster skim coat.

Variations of Soundproof Ceiling Systems

Where maximum noise reduction is required and any loss of space is less of an issue.

Sound Deadening Mat

  • There is an opportunity to add sound deadening mat to the acoustic lining system providing additional mass.
  • This is a mineralised rubber mat of either 5 Kg, 7 Kg or 10 Kg which acts like a sheet of lead.
  • This thin matting can be tacked to a frame or sandwiched between plasterboard layers and improves the mass of a structure for the minimal loss of space.

Alternative Sheet Materials

  • Whilst plasterboard is a widely available and commonly used sheet material other options do exist.
  • Cement particle board has even greater mass although is more difficult to cut and machine.
  • Proprietary acoustic boards, although more costly, can provide benefits. There boards are composite in construction and can deliver a number of acoustic material layers in a single sheet.

House structure

Advanced Sound Proofing Ltd will always, through our free consultation process, aim to match your requirements and budget to the most cost effective materials currently available.

We are constantly researching and trialling new innovations and products in association with our suppliers and Acoustic Manufacturing Specialists to find materials that will provide you, the customer, with the very best that the industry has to offer.