Soundproofing Floors 2017-10-24T13:00:03+00:00

SOUNDPROOFING FLOORS

Floors

This page deals with the solutions for soundproofing floors.

Traditional Timber Separating Floors – dealt with using a two part acoustic treatment

Part One – cavity insulation and preparation of the sub-floor.

  • Any existing floor coverings are lifted to expose the floorboards or tongue and grooved floor panels.
  • Selected existing floorboards/panels are lifted to expose the cavity space between the structural timber floor joists.
  • Soundproofing insulation 100 mm slab (RWA 45 Kg) is cut and friction fitted between the joists as a blanket coverage to the floor area.
  • If any recessed lights are present in the ceiling below these should be boxed in using a 19 mm plasterboard plank and sealed to airtight.
  • The original floorboards are then re-fitted and screwed securely to the joist with 50 mm wood screws.
  • Any gaps between boards, around the perimeters or around radiator tails or other penetrations are sealed to airtight.
  • If there is excessive deflection of the timber joists it is possible, within this stage, to add additional noggins set perpendicular to the line of the existing joists. This will tighten the floor and reduce ‘bounce’.
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Part Two – installation of the sub-floor acoustic overlay system

Options include floating acoustic board systems and heavy duty, good compression acoustic mats which are designed to add mass to the floor structure, provide compression to help reduce the effects of dynamic loading or footfall and absorb the effects of airborne and impact noise transmission.

Soundproofing Acoustic Overlay Mats for floors

This system will add approximately 7 mm thickness to the floor plane (when old underlay is removed).

Soundproofing mats are composite sheets comprising a dense layer for additional mass and a felt or foam core layer for compression. Mats are either glued to the sub-floor or loose laid in an overlapping brick stepped pattern.

  • Where carpets are due to be laid a perimeter isolation strip is tacked to the sub-floor to receive new carpet gripper rods.
  • Where other finishes are required the mat is butted up to the skirting with a foam isolation strip around the perimeter.
  • Carpets and engineered floating wooden or laminate floors can be laid directly on to acoustic mat without the need for additional underlay.
  • For vinyl floors it is recommended that a 6 mm ply deck is glued to the acoustic mat with a 2-4 mm perimeter gap.
  • It is not recommended to fit a ceramic tile over acoustic mat.
  • This system is floating on the sub-floor- there should be no mechanical fixings through the system into the sub-floor.

 

Soundproofing Acoustic Overlay Boards for floors

These systems will add from between 22 mm to 35 mm thickness to the floor plane

  • These are a wide range of generic composite boards which by design float over an existing sub-floor.
  • They are made up of layers of varying thickness and density and lock together to create a raft over the floor area.
  • The edges are cut and butted up to the existing skirting board with a foam strip isolating the board from the skirting.
  • The base layer is generally a felt or foam sheet that ‘floats’ on top of the existing sub-floor – with no mechanical fixings.
  • Subsequent layers of varying mass provide extra density to the floor plane.
  • Boards are manufactured with tongue and groove edges so that they can be glued together to create a solid raft over the floor plane.
  • Radiator pipes and any other penetration through the floor are carefully cut around and sealed to airtight.
  • Any doors affected by the increase in floor height are removed, planed down and rehung.
  • Shamfered threshold plates are installed where different floor heights are encountered.
  • It is recommended that these board systems are finished with a good quality underlay and carpet for optimum sound transmission reduction.
  • Alternatively you can lay an engineered floating wooden or laminate floor. Care should be taken to ensure a suitable gap around the perimeter of these floors to allow for expansion which would normally be hidden by skirting or scotia bead trim.
  • For kitchens and bathrooms it is possible to glue a ply deck to the acoustic board and finish with a ceramic tile or vinyl floor.

Structural Floating Floors

  • These systems are used in place of an existing sub-floor.
  • These structural floating floors are between 35 mm and 40 mm thickness.
  • The original skirting and sub-floor floorboards are removed exposing the original timber joists.
  • The new structural acoustic boards are installed lying on top of the joists with additional joist supports as required.
  • As with standard boards there is no mechanical fixing and perimeters are sealed with a foam strip.
  • Skirting boards are re-fitted once the acoustic floor is installed. Care should be taken to ensure a gap between skirting and floor which is then sealed to airtight.

Solid Floors

  • Concrete floors are fitted with the same standard acoustic overlay board systems with perimeter isolation foam strips.
  • An alternative system exists which requires a cradle and batten system and allows for additional insulation slab between the battens. There is also scope in this system to install an underfloor heating system.
  • Structural floating boards can be used in place of standard floating acoustic boards.
  • It is recommended that these board systems are finished with a good quality underlay and carpet for optimum performance.
  • Alternatively you can lay an engineered floating wooden or laminate floor. Care should be taken to ensure a suitable gap around the perimeter of these floors to allow for expansion which would normally be hidden by skirting or scotia bead trim.
  • For kitchens and bathrooms it is possible to glue a ply deck to the acoustic board and finish with a ceramic tile or vinyl floor.
  • With all overlay floor systems there may be a need to trim down the bottom of any doors affected by the increase in floor height.
  • Where a single room is treated with an overlay floor system a chamfered threshold strip is installed through the thickness of the door lining aperture to remove the trip hazard of differing floor levels.

House structure

Advanced Sound Proofing Ltd will always, through our free consultation process, aim to match your requirements and budget to the most cost effective materials currently available.

We are constantly researching and trialling new innovations and products in association with our suppliers and Acoustic Manufacturing Specialists to find materials that will provide you, the customer, with the very best that the industry has to offer.